Campaigner warns Tayside could be faced with mental health pandemic following coronavirus lockdown

Campaigner warns Tayside could be faced with mental health pandemic following coronavirus lockdown

Campaigner Phil Welsh believes Dundee could be on the cusp of a mental health pandemic at the end of the coronavirus crisis – as hundreds across the city struggle to cope during the nationwide lockdown.

Mr Welsh, whose son Lee took his own life in 2017, has fears over the future and thinks the current situation the country finds itself in is likely to set people back in a battle against anxiety and depression.

The Tele has spoken to one man, who wished to remain anonymous and is currently battling depression, about his struggles and he admitted that he had contemplated taking his own life throughout the lockdown, with isolation and loneliness playing a major part in his life.

Mr Welsh believes it is one of many examples of people struggling across the area – and believes a number of factors could be seeing even those living “normal lives” struggling with mental health conditions.

He said: “When the end of this Covid-19 crisis becomes apparent, my fear is the country will be faced with another pandemic, a mental health one.

“Isolation, social distancing, people being furloughed from their place of work will be playing a part because, it’s perhaps the case that work is the only social interaction many people have.

“My fear is those who in `normal` times have had no issues with mental health, may, through this unprecedented experience, begin to develop depression or anxiety.

“Added to this pressure, third sector organisations which are normally available to offer support to people with mental health issues are not available in the usual sense.”

Mr Welsh added: “These are challenging times with no rule book available.

“When we come out of this, we are going to be faced with a broken economy, a stretched to the max NHS and a mental health crisis such like the country has never experienced before.”

Crisis Centre | Not In Vain For Lee

Indea Ogilvie, who has recently taken over the the Let’s Talk Tayside support group, said that she was noticing many more people are asking for help help.

The Facebook page, which helps those suffering from mental health issues, supports many across the region and Ms Ogilvie believes there will be an even bigger demand for those sorts of groups in the coming months.

She said: “There is definitely an increase in messages from people facing mental health concerns.

“However there is also an an increase in people helping others out.

“I have been in touch with people personally and many others are also offering words of support and comforting each other at this difficult time.”

 

Link to Evening Telegraph here

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Shock figures reveal child suicide rates have risen by 160% in Scotland

Shock figures reveal child suicide rates have risen by 160% in Scotland

The huge increase has alarmed MSPs who want greater investment in mental health services

Shock new figures showing a 160% rise in suicide by children have laid bare the scale of Scotland’s mental health crisis.

Statistics released by the Government reveal an increase in the number of under 18s taking their own lives, fuelling calls for bold action.

Labour MSP Monica Lennon: “It is tragic and deeply worrying that so many children and young people have ended their lives in Scotland in recent years. Specialist youth mental health services are badly under-resourced.”

The NHS recently revealed 784 probable suicides in 2018 – a 15% rise compared to the previous years.

In the same twelve month period, suicides among those in the 15-24 age category soared by 50%.

However, these were one year figures and new data published this week drills down even further.

In 2014, ten under 18s completed suicide, but the total has steadily climbed and reached 26 in 2018 – a five year high.

The same information shows a near 25% rise between 2014 and 2018 in suicide among 18-24 year olds, from 59 to 75.

It comes after a Glasgow University study found that one in nine young people in Scotland have attempted suicide and one is six has self-harmed.

In June, it also emerged that the number of young people waiting more than a year for a specialist mental health service had more than trebled within 12 monthS.

Nearly 120 children and young people waited more than 53 weeks to be seen in the first three months of 2019.

Lennon added: “SNP Ministers have been warned repeatedly that vulnerable young people are falling through the cracks.

“Nicola Sturgeon’s government has made good commitments on mental health and suicide prevention; however, warm words are meaningless if education, youth services and the NHS are not getting enough investment.”

Scottish Greens MSP Alison Johnstone said: “It’s absolutely distressing to see suicide among young people at its highest level in five years. Each of these deaths has had a devastating impact on others and the wider community.

“For all the rhetoric on this, we still haven’t shifted the conversation enough onto prevention. The figures on self-harm should act as a warning sign, and we clearly need more early interventions, which would also reduce the pressure on acute services too.”

A Scottish Government spokesperson said: “It’s heartbreaking when anyone takes their own life.

“We are working tirelessly with partners to improve mental health services for young people, including those who have considered suicide or been bereaved by it. It is an area that the National Suicide Prevention Leadership Group is focusing on and we are working with COSLA to implement their recommendations.

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Pupils help charity to boost mental health in Dundee

Pupils help charity to boost mental health in Dundee

 

Link to Courier article here 

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‘I felt so worthless’: two teenagers on their mental health struggles

‘I felt so worthless’: two teenagers on their mental health struggles

Caitlin Dews, 18, Norton, North Yorkshire

I’ve struggled with my mental health for seven years. I’ve got anorexia, and depression and anxiety. It started at school when I was 11. I don’t remember the root causes. I just started being really anxious and restricting what I ate, and hiding food. I felt so worthless and horrible. I hated the way I looked. I started self-harming, my mood was really low and it all spiralled out of control.

I didn’t understand what was going on. After a while, I thought it was normal to feel like that. It’s only recently that I’ve started realising that a lot of people suffer.

When I was 14 a friend noticed I wasn’t eating and was really withdrawn and told a teacher. I was really angry and annoyed but, looking back, I’m glad she did that because I wouldn’t have said anything. They then told my parents and I was referred to child and adolescent mental health services. I still didn’t think anything was wrong with me.

My parents were heartbroken. I can’t imagine how hard it is for them. I’ve put them through so much. I was in hospital for just under a year and they had to visit me and see me in such a distressed state. I think they found it really tough and still do.

I felt I couldn’t go out for ages. Even now, when I go on public transport I get really anxious. At its worst I used to panic, my heart beat faster and I started shaking. My thoughts would race and I would think that everyone was staring at me and that something bad was going to happen. Everything was exaggerated. Most times, I felt like I deserved self-harming. It was like a punishment for eating or going out.

There are days when I feel more optimistic about my future. Things are still hard but I’m doing a lot better than I was. Quite a few people have told me that they struggle with anxiety. It’s not fair. I know some amazing and lovely people; they don’t deserve to be going through that.

Harvey Sparrow, 16, Badsey, Worcestershire

When I started my GCSEs, my school was really pushing everyone, saying we all had to do well and work hard. I’ve always been the sort of person who is very motivated but the stress started building slowly and I couldn’t handle it. The thought of going to school made me nervous and I felt like I wasn’t good enough. It carried on and I felt a lot of sadness and hopelessness. It was awful.

I started feeling really detached from myself. I didn’t feel in control of my body. It turned out that was a type of anxiety. My stomach felt like it was churning. I’d feel sick when I knew I didn’t have a stomach virus. I lost concentration and if there was even a small doubt about me doing well, I’d lose focus. I couldn’t deal with it. It got really dark at times. I felt there was no point in me being here because I wasn’t bringing anything to the world. I wasn’t making my life any better. I had a lot of suicidal thoughts. I told my dad and we went to see the doctor. It took a few appointments for them to take me seriously.

A lot of my friends have anxiety around school. I thought everyone else was OK because people didn’t show it. Some of them lose out on sleep, some sleep way too much and some are very depressed. They don’t see a point in living. I know what it’s like. But to hear them say things like that is shocking when in my eyes they’re amazing. I guess they would have said the same thing about me. It’s a weird situation.

When I talk to my dad he says he never wants anything bad to happen to me. Now I’m in a good place, I’m like: “Why would I ever think of ever hurting myself?” I don’t want to throw my life away just because I’m in a bad place.

 In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or emailjo@samaritans.org. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

 

Link to Guardian article here 

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Huge rise in students in Scotland seeking mental health support

Connor

The number of university students in Scotland seeking support for mental health issues has increased by two-thirds over five years, analysis shows.

The BBC asked universities across Scotland for the numbers of students seeking some form of support.

It found more than 11,700 students asked for help in 2016-17 compared with about 7,000 in 2012-13.

The 68% increased among students in Scotland was higher than the 53% total for the UK over the same period.

University counsellors and wellbeing staff told BBC Scotland that they deal with cases ranging from anxiety, depression, gender-based violence and body dysmorphia.

The figures – obtained by the BBC’s Shared Data Unit through freedom of information requests – showed that only 12 of Scotland’s 19 universities recorded how many students sought help for their health help over the five-year period.

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The data shows:

graphic
  • The number of students seeking help for their mental health at the University of Edinburgh doubled over five years
  • The University of Glasgow experienced a 75% rise in students seeking help for their mental health between 2012-13 and 2016-17
  • The University of Stirling had a 74% rise in students seeking help for their mental health between 2012-13 and 2016-17
  • Glasgow School of Art experienced a 72% increase in students seeking help for their mental health over the same period
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‘Not being able to return the favour had a toll on me’

Connor

Connor Smith was in his third year studying computer games development at the University of the West of Scotland when his close friend, who was also a student, took his own life.

“I was really shook up and didn’t know what to do with myself,” he said.

“I had struggled with my mental health before but the person who took his life was able to help me out of that, so not being able to return the favour had a toll on me.”

The university’s counselling team quickly offered to help Connor.

“I couldn’t speak to my family because I felt like I was burdening them,” he said.

“I couldn’t speak to my close friends either because they were going through the same thing.”

Connor said that he was struggling not only with the death of his friend but also his future prospects.

He said: “One evening I sat down and thought ‘what am I doing?’.

“I forced myself to work at university but I wasn’t in a good mind space. I really wasn’t enjoying what I was doing.”

Connor said he did not know what would have come of his life had it not been for the university’s support.

He said: “I wouldn’t have done so well.

“I might’ve quit university and if I did that, I don’t know what I would be doing.

“I had nothing lined up as a fall-back.”

Connor returned to counselling for a second time during his final year of studying. He was struggling with stress, overeating and had money worries.

He said: “[The support] wasn’t immediately available like before but, when I did get it, being able to speak to someone was so helpful.

“University was the best stretch of my life but easily the lowest I have been as well.”

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‘I don’t like the term snowflake’

student mental health

Ronnie Millar, director of counselling at the University of Edinburgh, said there is a “pernicious perfectionism” among students, which can affect their mental health.

He said: “When I was at university, there were no fees and we had student grants.

“Nowadays, more students have to work in part-time jobs and study, which puts a lot of pressure on them to succeed.”

Mr Millar said it was not helpful to label young people seeking help with terms such as snowflake, which imply they are less resilient than previous generations and too emotionally vulnerable.

He said: “I don’t like the term snowflake. I think it is a pejorative.

“In terms of resilience, some students struggle more than previous generations – but that’s not pointing the finger of blame.”

Mr Millar said that while there’s been a doubling in the male students coming forward for help for their mental health, the “proportion” has stayed the same over the five-year period.

“We say to students that [counselling] is not activity just for women, it’s for everyone.”

Social media bubble

student mental health

Dr Phil Quinn, head of counselling and psychological services at the University of Glasgow, said that while there was greater awareness of the help available, a “saturated” NHS had resulted in fewer community services for students to access mental health support.

He said: “We have had a record year in terms of referrals to the service, of students starting their university careers with already diagnosed mental health conditions.”

The University of Glasgow employed 20 staff in 2016-17 – ranging from cognitive behavioural therapists and a consultant psychiatrist to a counselling manager – to assist with the 2,330 students that came forward that year.

Quinn believes that staff numbers are sufficient to meet demand, and that the increase in students coming forward for help is partly down to a “24-hour social media bubble” where they are exposed to “criticism, bullying, and abuse”.

‘Crisis students’

Jackie Main, who is the director of student life at Glasgow Caledonian University, said it was not just the volume of students seeking support that was increasing but the complexity of the issues they presented with.

“We see a lot more crisis students than before,” she said.

“That could mean a student is actively self-harming, threatening suicide or requires being sectioned or hospitalised.

“Crisis students experience severe emotional distress, including panic attacks.”

At Glasgow Caledonian University, the number of students seeking support in 2016-17 hit 661, up 69% since 2012-13.

Ms Main added: “Anxiety and depression are the two big issues we’ve see increases in.

“We are not a crisis support service. We don’t have the resource and it is not our job. But we don’t let students fall through the net.”

Budgets

Eight of Scotland’s universities provided the BBC with their total budgets for mental health services – which in some cases included services that don’t just support student mental health, such as a disability service – in the five years to 2016-7.

It revealed an increase of 31% from £2.4m to £3.1m.

The University of Strathclyde (which did not provide complete figures for the number of students seeking help between 2012-13 and 2016-17) was the only institution to report a decrease in its overall budget over the five year period, down by 18%.

A spokeswoman for the university put the drop down to “re-structuring” and emphasised that significant investment – about £400,000 – had been made since 2017, including the creation of three full-time and 12 part-time posts on the mental health and wellbeing teams.

She said: “We have also introduced an online mental health support programme, which works hand-in-hand with our dedicated advisers and therapists, to ensure support is available for all.”

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‘Finding out you’ve failed all your classes is horrible’

Hannah

Hannah Moles was in her third year of studying maths at the University of Strathclyde when she approached student services for help.

Not only had she failed her first set of exams but she was also caring for her grandmother who had dementia.

She said: “My brother and I were going over three times a week to make my gran dinner, get the shopping and keep her company.

“She was really lonely.”

Hannah said that when she wasn’t caring for her gran, working in a part-time job which paid for her flat, or sleeping, she’d be in the library trying to study.

“I was really tired and had things on my mind constantly,” she said.

“So I went along to support services to see if I could calm myself down. I wanted to improve my mental state before my next set of exams.”

Hannah said that eight weeks after approaching student services, she received her first counselling appointment.

However, by this point Hannah had failed her second round of exams – meaning she wouldn’t be allowed to return for the fourth year of her degree.

“Finding out you’ve failed all your classes is horrible especially when you have put in the work but it is still not enough,” she said.

Hannah said that she was grateful to her university for providing mental health support but more counsellors would help meet the increasing demand.

“I am lucky that I got the support I needed,” she said.

“But there are lots of students who seem to need help with their mental health. I just hope that universities can keep up with the increasing demand.”

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’80 new counsellors’

The Scottish government’s most recent Programme for Government promised to provide more than 80 additional counsellors in further and higher education institutions over the next four years, with an investment of about £20m.

However, there is no indication yet how the funding will be split or which universities will receive more counsellors.

Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said every student “should have access to emotional and mental well-being support”.

“We will work closely with the university and college sectors, NUS Scotland and other partners, on the implementation of the additional counsellors, and to ensure an integrated and wrap-around approach to student wellbeing in higher and further education.”

Details of organisations offering information and support with mental health issues are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 888 809.

 

 

Link to BBC article here 

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MSP Mary Fee in call for better access to mental health services

A WEST of Scotland MSP has called for improved access to mental health services, particularly among young people

To mark World Mental Health Day last week, Labour’s Mary Fee lodged a motion at the Scottish Parliament calling for greater support for people who need help with their mental health.

Ms Fee’s motion says every individual who experiences poor mental health should have access to well-funded and adequately resourced support services within their local communities.

It is estimated that one in four people in Scotland suffer from poor mental health.

This year’s annual theme for World Mental Health Day, that took place on October 10, is young people.

Research conducted by Stonewall Scotland in 2017 found that 58 per cent of lesbian, gay or bisexual pupils and 96 percent of transgender pupils have deliberately harmed themselves.

Ms Fee said: “It is important that politicians, public servants and public bodies help to raise the profile of mental health.

“I believe that in order to break the stigma around mental health we must widen the conversation and deepen our knowledge and understanding of the range of mental health issues that people may experience throughout their lives.

“I am unequivocal in my belief that mental health should be treated with the same priority as physical health.

“It is a scandal that nearly one-third of young people are waiting longer than 18 weeks for vital mental health treatment. It is simply unacceptable.”

In marking the 70th anniversary of the NHS, Scottish Labour outlined a 10-point plan in which they pledged to provide access to a mental health counsellor for every school pupil in Scotland and improve the access to crisis mental health services.

The Scottish Government has since promised to invest in extra mental health services in schools, though Ms Fee warned that any dilution of the pledge will cause greater difficulties for children and young people accessing much needed treatment and support.

Clydebank MSP Gil Paterson added:“Most families will have known of someone with a mental health problem who has kept it hidden.

“The Scottish Government have done a lot of work on raising awareness of mental health and tackling the stigma associated with it.

“This work has resulted in a lot more people coming forward for treatment and the Government recognises that this puts added demands on the service, which is why the SNP Government has allocated an extra £250 million for mental health services, which includes £60m for schools to support 350 counsellors and 250 extra school nurses so that every secondary school will have a counselling service.

“I have asked a series of questions at the parliament about exactly what has been done to support mental health services in the past and the Post will be first to know when I get the answers.”

 

Link to Clydebank Post article here 

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