Recovery movement and mental health group to join together in a bid to help people ‘on a new level’

Recovery movement and mental health group to join together in a bid to help people ‘on a new level’

A grassroots recovery movement and an online mental health group are set to join forces under a new banner to support locals “on a new level”.

Recovery Dundee and Let’s Talk Tayside will come together to form Let’s Talk Recovery, helping those in recovery from addiction with a friendly and supportive social network.

RD co-founder Sharon Brand, LTT founder Ashley Bonini and personal trainer Mikie McCash hope to give those in the throes of recovery newfound physical and mental wellbeing – and a new network of friends.

Sharon co-founded Recovery Dundee in 2016 to give those dealing with addiction a source of hope to combat the associated mental health issues and loneliness that it can bring.

She later brought Mikie on board to provide free fitness sessions for those in recovery.

Ashley, meanwhile, founded Let’s Talk Tayside as an online group in which people could talk about their mental health openly, drawing on her experience as a student mental health nurse.

Since October last year, LTT’s membership has grown to more than 3,700 members.

Sharon said: “For the last seven months Mikie and I have been in touch with Ashley – we know mental and emotional health are very important so it made sense to come together.”

Ashley added: “It’s the missing link – and together we can try to help as many people as we can.”

The merger of the groups comes after the Dundee Drugs Commission published its report into local services in August.

That report, the result of 18 months of evidence gathering, interviews and both public and private meetings, found there was “a lack of mental health support for those who experience problems with drugs”.

As part of its recommendations, the Commission called on health chiefs to merge drug and mental health treatment, essentially treating them as one issue.

Let’s Talk Recovery’s aims are similar but the group is fiercely proud of its independence rooted in the communities that Sharon, Mikie and Ashley have built up.

Much of what the groups do on a day-to-day basis will not change – the “recovery cafe” nights at Beans and Berries will continue, as will Ashley’s organised group walks.

Sharon added: “We’ve got three years of working in the community and our own personal experience of recovery, of physical health, everything – we all have experience in what we’re working with.

“Coming together means strength in numbers and we can reach more people, and be taken more seriously.

“A community from which people can hear how they got off drugs or improved their mental health, that’s what recovery is about – that lived experience.

“You can’t have that if you are stuck in the system – it’s about feeling you can tackle it yourself.”

Mikie said: “Bringing all three of us together is one massive driving force. We all know what to do – we just need people to let us get on with it.

“We’ve tried it, tested it – what I do, what Sharon does, what Ashley does – but this will be on a level not done before.

“If people feel good, they can keep themselves on the right track – and our job is done.”

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