Tay Road Bridge bosses will look again at ways of adding suicide prevention measures to the crossing.

Councillor Stewart Hunter said he was prepared to once more raise concerns with fellow board members over people heading to the bridge in times of crisis.

The move is in response to criticism from mental health campaigner Phil Welsh, whose son Lee took his own life in 2017.

Phil Welsh with a photo of Lee.

Mr Welsh had accused bridge bosses of putting money before lives, after Tay Road Bridge chairwoman Lynne Short claimed an engineers’ report showed the “cost and inconvenience” of installing barriers was too prohibitive.

Mr Hunter, who preceded Ms Short as chairman, then wrote a letter to the Tele saying that finance “has never been a consideration with regards to adding barriers”.

He said: “The issue is that the bridge cannot support the additional weight and therefore it would compromise the integrity of the structure.”

In a letter to Mr Hunter, Mr Welsh said: “I would like to be provided with the commissioned engineering report which states that barriers cannot be put in place as this may compromise the structural integrity of the bridge.

“I would appreciate that at the next board meeting there is a very specific discussion in regard to what provision can be put in place as a means to deter people in crisis presenting themselves on the wrong side of the walkway.

“A view from engineers will simply not suffice.

“The public is demanding a commissioned survey to determine if remedial work can be carried out to strengthen the bridge, which in turn would enable physical deterrents to be installed.”

Mr Hunter said: “I will raise the issues again at the next meeting of the Tay Bridge Board.”

 

By Lindsey Hamilton

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